Monday, March 3, 2008

LA



5 comments:

Don Giannatti said...

OK... you got something going with these that is really hard to define. I sent the link to a friend and he said what I was thinking as well. The shots are documentary, and yet there is more going on in the image than the POV suggests, and yet it is really hard to put your finger on what is really happening. Whatever. I like 'em. The Texas shots too...

Anonymous said...

Thomas- Hi there. I hope you are well and enjoying your new project. Tim's blog keeps me up to date on the Broening blog- I am a reader slowly being sucked into the circling. I have some thoughts- not that you want to hear them but you have a blog so perhaps you do?

I have been looking at your new series a bit and I have to say that I am not sure what to think of most of these images. There is nothing going on in them. They seem to be lacking subject matter. Houses, empty streets, lack of people in the suburbs, lack of beauty in the burbs and cities (minus the awesome crazy-lit tree)? The focus is very sharp yet the images are all over the place. So much contemporary photography is like this. Granted so much commercial photography looks the same, but that's commerce and not art right? (Have you seen the book Lost in Transition by the way?)

I think you are getting somewhere interesting though when you mix the sad 4x5's with retouching- there you begin to tell an enigmatic and possibly sarcastic story instead of leaving your viewer standing in an empty crosswalk having forgotten what they left the house for.
emily

Anonymous said...

d

queenofoakland said...

Oh! If life could always provide the sense that something is "hard to define"! I keep looking at the new stuff and wondering, why am I feeling this? You've got a Eugene Atget cross-breeds-with-Bill Owens-in-modern-urban-landscape thing going. Keep it coming. Some make me happy. Some make me sad.

Llorenç Rosanes said...

Undoubtedly these three photos are brilliant. I do not need any conductive thread, do not need any explanation to go so far as to understand that it is what you wanted to show. What more can the spectator need? Perfect!